Photographer's Note

Among those interred here are : FREDERIC CHOPIN
grave, which you can see in my gallery, the grave of EDITH PIAF, HONORE DE BALZAC and so many NAMES of human remains who were very popular.

Père Lachaise Cemetery (French: Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, [simtjɛːʁ dy pɛːʁ laʃɛːz]; officially, cimetière de l'Est, "East Cemetery") is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris, France (44 hectares (110 acres)), though there are larger cemeteries in the city's suburbs.
Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement, and is reputed to be the world's most visited cemetery, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors annually to the graves of those who have enhanced French life over the past 200 years. It is also the site of three World War I memorials.
The cemetery is on Boulevard de Mnilmontant. The Paris Mtro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery.

History and description.
The cemetery takes its name from the confessor to Louis XIV, Père Franois de la Chaise (1624–1709), who lived in the Jesuit house rebuilt in 1682 on the site of the chapel. The property, situated on the hillside from which the king during the Fronde, watched skirmishing between the Cond and Turenne, was bought by the city in 1804. Established by Napoleon in this year, the cemetery was laid out by Alexandre-Thodore Brongniart, and later extended.
Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on 21 May 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adlaïde Pailliard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door-bell of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Napoleon Bonaparte as a consul declared that “Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion”.
Several new cemeteries replaced the Parisian ones, outside the precincts of the capital: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.
At the time of its opening, the cemetery was considered to be situated too far from the city and attracted few funerals. Moreover, the Christians refused to have their graves in a place that had not been blessed by the Church. In 1804, the Père Lachaise had contained only 13 graves. Consequently, the administrators devised a marketing strategy and in 1804, with great fanfare, organised the transfer of the remains of La Fontaine and Molière. The following year there were 44 and 49 in 1806, 62 in 1807 and 833 in 1812. Then, in another great spectacle in 1817, the purported* remains of Pierre Ablard and Hloïse were also transferred to the cemetery with their monument's canopy made from fragments of the abbey of Nogent-sur-Seine (by tradition, lovers or lovelorn singles leave letters at the crypt in tribute to the couple or in hope of finding true love).
This strategy achieved its desired effect when people began clamouring to be buried among the famous citizens. Records show that, within a few years, Père Lachaise went from containing a few dozen permanent residents to more than 33,000 in 1830. Père Lachaise was expanded five times: in 1824, 1829, 1832, 1842 and 1850. Today there are over 1 million bodies buried there, and many more in the columbarium, which holds the remains of those who had requested cremation.
The Communards' Wall (Mur des Fdrs) is also located in the cemetery. This is the site where 147 Communards, the last defenders of the workers' district of Belleville, were shot on 28 May 1871 – the last day of the "Bloody Week" (Semaine Sanglante) in which the Paris Commune was crushed.

This information are from WIKIPEDIA

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Barbara Stec (Sonata11) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2760 W: 59 N: 2914] (34119)
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  • Date Taken: 2008-06-28
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  • : f/4, 1/100
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  • Date Submitted: 2012-03-17 7:10
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Additional Photos by Barbara Stec (Sonata11) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2760 W: 59 N: 2914] (34119)
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