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Great macondo 2010-08-18 2:48

Hello Bernard, and welcome to TE.
I like this for a first upload. Perhaps it could be given a little more contrast, but not too much. I like the sharpness and the well controlled exposure of the highlights, the mixture of light and shadow. The buildings look dwarfed by the mountain and the clouds. I wonder what that sky would look like in colour. Sometimes it's interesting for the viewers to see the colour version in a Workshop. Anyway, it's a pleasing photo.
Regards,
Andrew

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Old 08-19-2010, 08:45 AM
berniem berniem is offline
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Hello.
Thanks for your comment about my BW pic.
I m always trying to work on my pic contrast but I never know which version is the best (i know it's still a point of view, but...)
I like the stuff you do with colors (the church, Annecy,...). Do you do a lot of postproduction or most of the job is done when you take the pic ?
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Old 08-19-2010, 11:08 AM
macondo macondo is offline
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Hi Bernard.
The truth about digital photography is that there is no such thing as a 'pure' photo - the camera companies all use some kind of internal programming in the camera to produce .jpg files, and some prefer to concentrate on sharpness and detail, others to reduce noise. If you have a DSLR camera or high-level compact or super-zoom, you may shoot RAW images and then convert them yourself to .jpg. This will involve some adjustment of the various elements, such as saturation, contrast, and so on, or you might use a program like Photoshop so you can create layer masks. These allow you to adjust selective areas of the photo, such as a bright sky or dark landscape under the bright sky. I believe it is wrong to think that digital cameras can produce 'finished' photos. EVERY photo from a digital camera is post-processed, even if it was only inside the camera.

It is just a question of being restrained in what you do. Some photos look terrible because they have too much post-processing. TE has too many of these photos, and also too many that have just come straight from the camera - they usually lack contrast and sharpness, maybe saturation too, and often have horizons that are not level. It's just a question of adjusting your photo so that it looks like the scene that you remember when you took the shot.

The only advice I give people is to shoot with slight under-exposure rather than over-exposure. If a sky is 'blown' (all white) you cannot put any detail back into it. But if something is under-exposed you can lighten it. And also, you should not adjust contrast so much that the shaded areas look BLACK, the bright areas totally WHITE. I think this applies to both colour and b/w shots. Always remember details are more important than extreme contrast.

One other thing that a lot of TE members do is use a Circular Polarising Filter when shooting colour shots in bright sunlight - it provides more blue in the sky, less reflection and richer colours.

So, to answer your question, yes I always do some post-processing work on my shots. But I try to make them look as natural as possible.

Hope I have helped a bit.

Regards,
Andrew
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  #3  
Old 08-19-2010, 11:08 AM
macondo macondo is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3,466
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Hi Bernard.
The truth about digital photography is that there is no such thing as a 'pure' photo - the camera companies all use some kind of internal programming in the camera to produce .jpg files, and some prefer to concentrate on sharpness and detail, others to reduce noise. If you have a DSLR camera or high-level compact or super-zoom, you may shoot RAW images and then convert them yourself to .jpg. This will involve some adjustment of the various elements, such as saturation, contrast, and so on, or you might use a program like Photoshop so you can create layer masks. These allow you to adjust selective areas of the photo, such as a bright sky or dark landscape under the bright sky. I believe it is wrong to think that digital cameras can produce 'finished' photos. EVERY photo from a digital camera is post-processed, even if it was only inside the camera.

It is just a question of being restrained in what you do. Some photos look terrible because they have too much post-processing. TE has too many of these photos, and also too many that have just come straight from the camera - they usually lack contrast and sharpness, maybe saturation too, and often have horizons that are not level. It's just a question of adjusting your photo so that it looks like the scene that you remember when you took the shot.

The only advice I give people is to shoot with slight under-exposure rather than over-exposure. If a sky is 'blown' (all white) you cannot put any detail back into it. But if something is under-exposed you can lighten it. And also, you should not adjust contrast so much that the shaded areas look BLACK, the bright areas totally WHITE. I think this applies to both colour and b/w shots. Always remember details are more important than extreme contrast.

One other thing that a lot of TE members do is use a Circular Polarising Filter when shooting colour shots in bright sunlight - it provides more blue in the sky, less reflection and richer colours.

So, to answer your question, yes I always do some post-processing work on my shots. But I try to make them look as natural as possible.

Hope I have helped a bit.

Regards,
Andrew
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:18 PM
berniem berniem is offline
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Thanks a lot for your advices ! It's quite close of my working way, but I still try to do the best when I push on the button. Like u say, I always under-expose, do we really have the choice ?
You're doing good work, keep going and I will have pleasure to give a look to your pics.

Take care
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