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Good rabani 2004-08-04 5:13

Everybody needs a friend don't you think. Be it 4 legged kind or less. To man, dog is still his best friend. No complain and always on guard to protect you. I like your idea of getting this shot;something like walking toward the sunset genre. Guess your camera wasn't helping much in tracking your subjects Hanza. Some cameras have trouble keeping focus on subject moving away or toward you.

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Old 08-05-2004, 05:08 AM
hanza hanza is offline
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Default To rabani: Tracking?

Hi Rabani...what is tracking subjects..and what do i need to do and how...no idea what tracking means in photography.
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Old 08-05-2004, 06:38 AM
rabani rabani is offline
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Default Tracking

Dear hanza,
Tracking is something the camera does to maintain the subject you are focusing on, in focus. Usually it is automatic. When the subject moves, the camera adjusts the lens to maintain the focus.

Focusing starts when you press the shutter button halfway. Pressing the shutter button slowly,you will hear the camera focusing on the subject in front of it. It will stop focusing once the subject is sharp.

To see how good your camera at tracking subject, do this experiment.

1. Ask one of your three children to stand in front of the camera.
2. Press the shutter button slowly to focus on your child. You will know it starts to focus by the whirring sound the camera is making.
3. When you see your child is in focus, keep your finger depressed still on the shutter button.
4. Ask your child to walk backward or forward. As your child moves, you will hear your camera refocusing the lens. While doing this, make sure your finger is still pressing the shutter button halfway. Pressing it any further in, the camera stops focusing and would release the shutter.

Why is your subject blur? When your camera released the shutter, the subject has moved away from its original focus position.Therefore making it blur. You wouldn't have this problem if your subject doesn't move, like in potrait or still photography.

Taking photo of something which is still moving requires new techniques. I am here if you need help.

I hope I answered you.
Rabani
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Old 08-05-2004, 12:13 PM
hanza hanza is offline
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Default Re: Tracking

Hi,Rabani
Thank you for the explanation..yeap..now i know..just like when you want to take fast movung cars..you have to do the tracking.
Hi Rabani..do you think you can explain what is the Autoexposure Bracketing...and when should i use during photogarapy..thank.
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Old 08-05-2004, 12:55 PM
rabani rabani is offline
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Default Autoexposure Bracketing

You are welcome Hanza.
Autoexposure Bracketing is a feature with some cameras which could take 3 pictures of the same scene but with different exposure. While some of these cameras take these 3 pictures automatically by pressing the shutter button once, others you have to press the shutter button 3 times.

Each of these 3 pictures has different exposure. Usually the first picture is "normal", the 2nd one overexposed and the 3rd one underexposed. Just check your camera how it does the bracketing Hanza.How it overexposes or underexposes depend on your setting.

From the 3 pictures taken, you select which one you prefer or looked right to you.

So when do you bracket?
When the scene is so contrasty. For instant, when it is noon or the scene is made up of too many bright areas as well as dark areas.

For digital photography, I would suggest you underexposes your photo by 1/3 stop or at most 1 stop. For example, if your camera says the shutter speed should be 1/125, select the next higher speed, for instance 1/300. Or if the camera suggest you take f/4, you go f/5.

This is the same trick with slide film photography. You see when your photo is underexposed a little bit, you could bring out the details in the shadows. But overexposed photo, you lost it.

Hope I made things clearer Hanza.
Regards
Rabani
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Old 08-05-2004, 06:53 PM
hanza hanza is offline
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Default Re: Autoexposure Bracketing

Thanks Rabani..
What your choice of camera..SLR or Digital...i have micro len for my digital(nikon coolpix990)..but never get to use it properly.Can you get a good DOF with digital camera ?
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Old 08-06-2004, 02:58 AM
rabani rabani is offline
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Default Re: Autoexposure Bracketing

My choice of camera...SLR or Digital? Both.
I am always in favor of SLR and because of my profession, I would prefer Digital SLR.

Currently, there are 2 low cost Digital SLR or commonly abbreviated as DSLR. Canon EOS 300D and Nikon D70. My recommendation to you is Canon EOS 300D.It comes in a kit costing RM3999. In the kit you get the camera body + 18-55mm lens. The lens is quite good and could handle wide angle as well as macro. For travel/adventure photography, you need to spend another RM1500 for a good zoom lens. The zoom lens I am using is a Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.5. Sigma has also the same lens going for a lot less. But if you have money to burn, the latest sophisticated lens with the same configuration as the Tamron's is from Canon, going for RM9500.

Yes, you can get a good DOF with digital camera. Regardless whether it's a digital camera or film,it's the lens and aperture that does the trick. If you want shallow DOF, use f/2.8. Usually this is for macro. Deep DOF starts around f/6. The sweet spot for landscape is f/8.

Regards
Rabani
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Old 08-06-2004, 11:59 AM
hanza hanza is offline
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Default Re: Autoexposure Bracketing

hi RAbani..
i have nikon F70D(Auto and Manual with panaromic as well) with lens35-80mm and a len sigma 70-300( 1:4-5.6 D) with Apo macro and Tamron_F AF Tele- Converter2xn-AFD MC4..all these number is very confusing..(dont realy know how to use converter and i have flash Sb-27... never get to use flash for night photography..did one time..but the picture comes out dark..
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Old 08-09-2004, 03:23 AM
rabani rabani is offline
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Default Re: Autoexposure Bracketing

Hie Hanza, sorry about those numbers. You know how it is with this technical world, if its not numbers its jargons.
You have a good camera set up here.I would think it is complete with lens covering from 35mm all the way to 300mm. You even have a 2Xconverter too. The converter converts your lens to double its ranges. So your 70-300mm(1:4-5.6D) becomes 140-600mm, good for nature & sport photography. But...there's a but when using teleconverter. Your lens widest aperture now becomes 5.6 instead of 4. So you need to use high speed film when shooting with teleconverter. I suggest ISO400 as a start and for film at that speed, the best is Fujifilm ISO 400 Superia 35mm Color Print Film as the grains is finer than other manufacturers.

When using flash for night photography, just make sure your subject is within 10 feet away from you. And use fast film too like ISO400 as I suggested above.

APO means the lens is apochromatic. It means the lens focuses all the colors into the same point. So if all the colors of rainbow is focused onto the same spot, there will be one spot of "white" color. Without apo, you probably have a spot of banded colors or color "fringing", which is not good.

Regards
Rabani
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Old 08-09-2004, 11:55 AM
hanza hanza is offline
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Default Thank you

Hi..Rabani..
Thank you so much so the explanation ... you sure do know so much about photography(just 4 a joke :)... and i know at least i know how to use my convertor...with film ISO 400.
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Old 08-10-2004, 02:58 AM
rabani rabani is offline
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Default You are welcome

You are always welcome Hanza. Photography...I am still learning. I think all of us are. Just be careful when using converter. Most photographers when using converters, use high speed film (ISO400, etc). If not, you might get a lot of "dark" pictures because camera tend to underexpose when using it. To get more light in, we lower the shutter speed and you would get into trouble with motion blurs. Especially also when you are zooming more than 300mm. Using a converter, the 300mm becomes 600mm and a little shake or motion, either from you or your subject, would produce blurry photo.And when using teleconverter, you have to use tripod.

Just remember this;once your shutter speed is below 1/125 either use a tripod or increase your ISO to the next ISO setting.

Regards
Rabani
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